ACSME 2019 – It’s a wrap

What a wonderful conference this was! Over 230 academics, professional staff and students came to share their experiences and to connect with colleagues who are dealing with similar challenges. The central theme was the student experience. We heard powerful stories from students. We had deep discussions about educational environments we should strive to create to place all of our students, whatever their background and experiences, at the centre of our endeavours; data driven research is key to understanding the student experience and informing the creation of such environments. Individual presentations ranged over a large number of topics and challenges and showcased the breadth and depth of the work that goes into making the experience of science students and graduates meaningful and of the highest quality.

Discipline day at UTS Central followed with meetings for the discipline networks in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biomedical sciences and environmental sciences, for discussions on topics of current interest. In the afternoon, this was followed by workshops on theoretical research frameworks, distributed leadership to embed scholarship in STEM teaching teams, and several tools for better learning of electromagnetism, scientific processes and chemistry labs. This was followed by a tour of the new UTS “Hive” Superlab!

Thank you again to our hosts, University of Sydney and UTS, and sponsors UNSW, 3M Australia and Cengage Learning, the conference committees and volunteers, and all the delegates who presented at the conference.

Professor Pauline Ross

ACSME 2019 Conference Chair

In 2020 ACSME will go to the West Coast: it will be held in Perth 30 September-2 October. The organising team is already planning for another memorable conference. We hope to see you there!

ACSME 2019 theme: Student Experience and Student Stories

The 2019 Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education will have a specific focus on the student experience and student stories. We are well into the 4th Industrial Revolution and in higher education we are at a point of inflexion. We can either choose business as usual and slip behind the others, or we can choose to partner with our students to provide them with the opportunities to build their capabilities to ensure that they can make significant and meaningful contributions to Australia and the world.

Conference Committee

Chair, Prof Pauline Ross (University of Sydney) pauline.ross@sydney.edu.au
Prof Manju Sharma (University of Sydney) manjula.sharma@sydney.edu.au
Prof Cristina Varsavsky (Monash) Cristina.Varsavsky@monash.edu
Prof Phil Poronnik (University of Sydney) philip.poronnik@sydney.edu.au
A/Prof Peter Meier (UTS) Peter.Meier@uts.edu.au
Ms Stephanie Beames (UQ) s.beames@uq.edu.au

Program Committee

Chair, A/Prof Louise Lutze-Mann (UNSW) l.lutze-mann@unsw.edu.au
A/Prof Elizabeth Angstmann (UNSW) e.angstmann@unsw.edu.au
Dr Diana Warren (University of Sydney) diana.warren@sydney.edu.au
Dr Samantha Clarke (University of Sydney) samantha.clarke@sydney.edu.au
Dr Reyne Pullen (UNSW) r.pullen@unsw.edu.au
Dr Leanne Rylands (WSU) l.rylands@westernsydney.edu.au
Dr Scott Cornish (University of Sydney) scor6595@sydney.edu.au 
Dr Bianca Waud (University of Sydney) bianca.waud@sydney.edu.au

Need more information?

Contact the organisers askACSME@gmail.com